… unless you’re Anonymous.

I saw on the news about the hacked credit cards and accounts being used to donate money to charity.

Whilst I am all for forcing companies and big corporate entities by law to donate at least 2.5% of their total profit to charity (considering many corporate entities don’t even give half of 1% to charity), one must remember before we applaud Anonymous for this move the legalities of this situation.

Under the law, victims of credit card fraud or account theft are entitled to claim the money back that was lost to them, and whilst this is often done very quickly by the companies, the shocking truth is this; the banks, credit card companies etc. get that money back from the source – and in this case, it’s the charities such as the Red Cross.

Not only does that mean that the Red Cross and other charities end up with no donation at all, but it costs them money in administrative costs and legal fees to put it right – meaning that these “donations” actually have COST THE CHARITIES MONEY.

I believe that the likes of Apple, Fox News and co. should be forced to give some of their wealth to charity. Of course I do. I believe in charity, I relied on one to get my life together a couple years ago, I still see a councillor and have a support worker that make sure I’m doing better (which thankfully I am) – this is often funded through charity, especially here in the UK where the NHS waiting lists often mean people don’t get the help they need when they need it.

I also believe it necessary to raise awareness of many charities like Mind, Rethink, Action for Children, The Red Cross etc. I believe too much money and wealth IS tied up in the top 1%, and in truth, generates more in simple interest than they give away to charity. That makes me rather sad, especially at a time when so many savers and people are in such dire circumstances based on the actions of many of these very wealthy banks and investors.

But not like this. Not when the net result is hurting charities who desperately need the money to spend on doing what they do, and do well. That isn’t fair on those who lost money, nor is it fair on the charities, nor anyone tied up in this horrid little affair. The winners in this are the legal people who charge so much to rectify these situations.

And for me, the real losers in this are Anonymous, who may have intended this as a nice gesture – but it is one that has backfired, and backfired badly. In a year where their name has been dragged through the mud, this was supposed one assumes to be a Robin Hood affair – to help improve their image. But it has instead forced money from charity to be spent on costs, admin and legal fees – taking money from the front lines of these charities where it is so desperately needed.

And that, to me, is simply unforgivable.

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One Response to “… unless you’re Anonymous.”

  1. […] information, and in some cases, caused real financial damage. Before Christmas, I reported on a very notable example. Whilst on the surface it seemed a good idea, the reality is this inevitably cost the charities who […]

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